our altered places

(2011-2015)

media: digital installation

concepts: place, technology

Our Altered Places is an art series that takes the meaning of a place and attempts to influence it using alternative histories or identities that are not prominent in that particular place. The project began in 2011 at a residency in The Big Picure , Tallaght. It features digital media installations and web-based art platforms.

It is influenced by writing on place by theorists including Michel de Certeau, Michel Foucault, Marc Augé, Anne Galloway and Georges Perec.

Nothing Lasts Forever

web installation 2015, dimensions screen-specific

A web-based installation on the ephemeral nature of internet (and all) technology, taking the space of a functional website and turning it into an interactive place.

Nothing lasts forever.

Click to view the installation.

a screenshot of the nothing lasts web installation

Nowhen

projection, video, audio sensors, interactive Processing program 2014, dimensions variable

A digital installation that is designed to replicate the idea of sonar technology that was built for the Phase One Festival at The Dock Arts Centre, Carrick-on-Shannon, Ireland, 2014.

The piece generated a video image of people and objects in the gallery space whenever a sound was "heard" by the installation. It mimicked sonar technology, and invited people to view objects and themselves as part of the art centre.

Nowhen installation at The Dock Arts Centre

Dial-an-Odyssey

Telephone, Arduino, Raspberry Pi, Python program, audio 2013, 18x12x24cm

Consisted of two phones, one which recorded user stories, the other played back these recordings. It was placed at the library in Granby Park, a pop-up artist-led space staged in north Dublin, August-September 2013.

Made in collaboration with Gary McDermott and Louise Noone.

Dial an Odyssey at Granby Park

Tetralogy I - Demosthenes

laptop, webcam, audio, interactive Processing program 2013, dimensions variable

A series of digital interventions installed at Trinity College Dublin Front Square, August 2013.

Consisted of four digital installations that gathered different user feedback including gesture, audio, facial recognition and text input through keyboard. The installations were based on the four figures represented on the Campanile in the square: Demosthenes, Homer, Socrates and Plato, and were designed to make users rethink the place through digital media interventions.

Piece i, Demosthenes, was based around the ancient orator's methods of convincing crowds and speaking publicly. This piece uses a webcam to detect faces (cueing interaction), and speaks to passers-by about the project.

Made in collaboration with Gary McDermott and Louise Noone.

visitors using the Demosthenes installation

Tetralogy II - Homer

Telephone, Arduino, Raspberry Pi, Python program, audio 2013, dimensions variable

A series of digital interventions installed at Trinity College Dublin Front Square, August 2013.

Consisted of four digital installations that gathered different user feedback including gesture, audio, facial recognition and text input through keyboard. The installations were based on the four figures represented on the Campanile in the square: Demosthenes, Homer, Socrates and Plato, and were designed to make users rethink the place through digital media interventions.

Piece ii, Homer, was based around the idea of collecting and telling stories, as with the ancient bard Homer. Two phone units utilising Arduino boards and Raspberry Pi microcomputers respectively record visitor's stories and play-back the stories. Visitors are encouraged to speak about the place (the Front Square at Trinity).

Made in collaboration with Gary McDermott and Louise Noone.

A visitor using the Homer installation

Tetralogy II - Homer

Telephone, Arduino, Raspberry Pi, Python program, audio 2013, dimensions variable

A series of digital interventions installed at Trinity College Dublin Front Square, August 2013.

Consisted of four digital installations that gathered different user feedback including gesture, audio, facial recognition and text input through keyboard. The installations were based on the four figures represented on the Campanile in the square: Demosthenes, Homer, Socrates and Plato, and were designed to make users rethink the place through digital media interventions.

Piece ii, Homer, was based around the idea of collecting and telling stories, as with the ancient bard Homer. Two phone units utilising Arduino boards and Raspberry Pi microcomputers respectively record visitor's stories and play-back the stories. Visitors are encouraged to speak about the place (the Front Square at Trinity).

Made in collaboration with Gary McDermott and Louise Noone.

a visitor speaking on the homer installation

Tetralogy III - Socrates

Keyboard, monitor, Twitter, interactive Processing program 2013, dimensions variable

A series of digital interventions installed at Trinity College Dublin Front Square, August 2013.

Consisted of four digital installations that gathered different user feedback including gesture, audio, facial recognition and text input through keyboard. The installations were based on the four figures represented on the Campanile in the square: Demosthenes, Homer, Socrates and Plato, and were designed to make users rethink the place through digital media interventions.

Piece iii, Socrates, was based around the Socratic method, a way of imparting knowledge through dialogue. It takes user input through a keyboard in answer to questions that were set by the artists and relate to the place. The answers were later added to a Twitter feed via a JavaScript code.

Made in collaboration with Gary McDermott and Louise Noone.

visitors using the socrates installation

Tetralogy III - Socrates

Keyboard, monitor, Twitter, interactive Processing program 2013, dimensions variable

A series of digital interventions installed at Trinity College Dublin Front Square, August 2013.

Consisted of four digital installations that gathered different user feedback including gesture, audio, facial recognition and text input through keyboard. The installations were based on the four figures represented on the Campanile in the square: Demosthenes, Homer, Socrates and Plato, and were designed to make users rethink the place through digital media interventions.

Piece iii, Socrates, was based around the Socratic method, a way of imparting knowledge through dialogue. It takes user input through a keyboard in answer to questions that were set by the artists and relate to the place. The answers were later added to a Twitter feed via a JavaScript code.

Socrates at Tetralogy screenshot of interactive function

Tetralogy IV - Plato

Monitors, XBox Kinect, Interactive programs 2013, dimensions variable

A series of digital interventions installed at Trinity College Dublin Front Square, August 2013.

Consisted of four digital installations that gathered different user feedback including gesture, audio, facial recognition and text input through keyboard. The installations were based on the four figures represented on the Campanile in the square: Demosthenes, Homer, Socrates and Plato, and were designed to make users rethink the place through digital media interventions.

Piece number iv, Plato, was based on Plato's philosophies in relation to society and control. This piece was used as the "sting in the tale" of the four linked works, and revealed the artists' aims of showing digital media's often invasive nature in places. It takes gestural input and consists of video and audio devices controlled with sensors.

Made in collaboration with Gary McDermott and Louise Noone.

A friend visitor at the Plato installation

Linear

Acrylic on paper 2012, 73 x 70cm

A series of digital interventions installed at Trinity College Dublin Front Square, August 2013.

Consisted of four digital installations that gathered different user feedback including gesture, audio, facial recognition and text input through keyboard. The installations were based on the four figures represented on the Campanile in the square: Demosthenes, Homer, Socrates and Plato, and were designed to make users rethink the place through digital media interventions.

Piece number iv, Plato, was based on Plato's philosophies in relation to society and control. This piece was used as the "sting in the tale" of the four linked works, and revealed the artists' aims of showing digital media's often invasive nature in places. It takes gestural input and consists of video and audio devices controlled with sensors.

Made in collaboration with Gary McDermott and Louise Noone.

visitors using the plato installation

Untitled (Binaural)

Audio, layered image stills on monitor, touchscreen, interactive Processing program 2011, 220 x 320 x 430cm

This interactive sound and video piece was created for a residency at The Big Picture, Tallaght.

3-dimensional sounds were captured using binaural technology and brought into the exhibition space to bring a sense of the area of Tallaght into the disused technology hub. For a scaled-down version of the interactive work click here.

Made in collaboration with Sara Amido, David Collier and Thom Connaty.

a viewer interacting with the Binaural artwork

Street Talk

Audio, live video, two projections

This interactive sound piece was created for a residency at The Big Picture, Tallaght.

The artwork featured two projected live Skype streams, one inside the gallery space, the other outside, that encouraged viewers to re-experience their space by communicating from inside to outside.

Made in collaboration with Sara Amido, David Collier and Thom Connaty.

a viewer interacting with the Skype artwork